Chicken stew– as requested :-)

So I have a friend who is moving toward more gluten & corn-free options, and asked what I do about breakfast. It’s more non-traditional as American food, but according to our acupuncturist, the Chinese might see it as quasai-normal 🙂 I kinda like that thought, because I see the Eastern cultures as closer to the Ancient Hebrew mindset– Near East is closer to Far East than Western, I think. Higher-protein breakfasts are great for setting our blood sugar level at a good, solid, steady outset for the day. Here’s a breakfast for a cold winter morning, usually left-over from dinner the night before, so I’ll include the gist of that as well:

Dinner:

I start w/ the rice first– for our family, I make a huge batch– about 4 cups– soak it in warm water w/ a couple of drops of Apple Cider Vinegar and a heaping Tbsp of Real Salt for most of the day, or overnight, depending on when I remember to start it. Soaking it first helps to make it more digestible, and to improve the protein and mineral content of grains. Most ancient cultures did it as a regular practice. We’ve just gotten away from it in our instant gratification “now” society. ‘Gotta remember to cover it– especially in the summer: the fruit flies love ACV. Bake in a covered dish at 350 ’till the water’s all soaked up.  You might have a preferred method for your rice– this is just easy for me: a giant bowl w/ a cookie sheet over the top to hold the steam in.

1-2 Chickens, depending on the size of the family & appetites, in an oven-friendly pot / dish that just fits– not too much bigger.

Wash chicken thoroughly, place in the pot, and salt liberally– with Real Salt (not the bleached stuff: the docs are right: the bleached stuff might kill you LOL! I eat all the Real Salt I want, though– tastes good, and my body loves it!)

Add a fist-full of thyme, a fist-full of onion powder, and about a heaping Tbsp of garlic powder per chicken. I use ‘way more seasonings than I’ve ever seen recipes call for– at the encouragement of my Chinese MD’s wife– a nutritionist: she says there’s as much nutrition in the seasonings as in the food–, and in honor of the Scripture in TaNaK where Isaac wants his “savory meat” when he’s gettin’ old. I figure if good seasonings can help an elderly guy digest meat, then maybe it’s good for all of our digestion? Works for me & my guts, anyhow!

Genesis 27: 3“Now then, please take your gear, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me; 4and prepare a savory dish for me such as I love, and bring it to me that I may eat, so that my soul may bless you before I die.”

Drizzle with olive oil, and add a sprinkling of water to moisten the herbs, and about an inch or so of water in the bottom of the dish. Cover w/ a lid… I use a cookie sheet over the top sometimes ’cause I don’t always have a matching lid.

Bake at 350… I bake most everything at 350– don’t have to think so much– you can try other temperatures if you like, and see if your chicken gets done faster than mine. Sometimes, if I’m in a hurry, I’ll bake it a bit hotter, and it seems to do just fine, as long as I have a lid on it. Might take an hour or so… I never time anything– just when the juices run clear, and there’s no pink left anywhere inside.  When the seasonings start to smell strong, it’s not quite done yet, but soon 🙂

While that’s baking, I chop carrots, kale, comfrey, broccoli, onions, kohlrabi, pak choi, spinach, chard, beet greens … whatever veggies I happen to have on-hand, and start ’em steaming– longer for softer veggies; shorter for crunchier ones. I like to have at least one brassica (the broccoli family) for anti-cancer and blood sugar-balancing properties all in one 🙂 Save the water that they were steamed in: good for adding vitamins & minerals to the stew for tomorrow morning.

When everyone’s done eating, I de-bone what’s left of the chicken, and put all the bits of meat into a pot. If the veggies went over well, I leave them as they are, and toss them in, too. If they didn’t go over so well, I run ’em through the blender w/ just a bit of steaming water, and maybe some of that broth from the bottom of the chicken pan: just enough liquid to get ’em to puree nicely. The kiddos generally love their veggies best in stew.

All of those left-overs (except for the rice) go into the pot in the fridge for breakfast the next day, except for the bones– those get boiled overnight– outdoors. The moisture in the air and the formaldehyde in our floors don’t mix well w/ my joints, so making bone broth is an outdoor event. Strain the broth, stir into the stew, & re-heat in the am, and pour over the rice as though it were mashed ‘taters– you know, with the well in the middle… or just mix it all up.  If you like, you can re-heat the rice, but I usually leave it cold to take a bit of the heat out of the stew for the kids– otherwise they just ask for icecubes anyway 🙂

Standard Disclaimer:

I’m  no doc, and don’t pretend to be one. I am therefore not legally licensed to diagnose, cure, treat, prevent, or otherwise mitigate any disease, and neither is the stuff I generally choose for healing… but then, I’ve not been educated indoctrinated by boards with big pharma reps on them, either ;-)   so do your own research and find what works for you :-)

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2 comments
  1. wonderful, friend! thank you 🙂 this looks great. i have been soo blessed by your gentle encouragement to season, season, season! liberally and generously. 😉 your food is always so delicious – a testament to great seasoning. 😉
    ok, so i need to get more diligent on eating greens … a wide variety. and i need to be creative about getting them in to my family’s bellies 😉

    • Love to you, Home2Learn– I’m continually working on that one, too LOL! We all walk learning 🙂

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