Well-Rooted, Deep Healing

Well-Rooted, Deep Healing

Our shallow, modern society is screaming for ROOTS!  Ever hear the expressions “rooted,” “deep,” and “roots” when nobody’s talking about plants? We all love these ideas– getting back to something “foundational,” “nourishing,” and “pervasive”… like comfrey 😉

We’re tending a garden, studying Ancient Hebrew, Drinking Ginger Tea, Eating Garlic, Onions, Beets, and Yams… and I think it’s all connected 🙂 We’ve moved a dozen or more times in the last decade or so. We’ve uprooted from the mythology we were brought up with, and are finding the Original Roots of the original Rabi Yashua. It’s not been a popular move, and changing cultures is never easy. No matter how good the change is, change still equals stress. I’m thinking that gardening– that Original Picture of “Perfect Life” in the Garden– and our root-rich diet may be medicinal for this spiritual and cultural “transplant.” I’m thankful for Ginger Root for digestive trouble (anybody ever had that when they’re stressed-out?), Garlic Root for warding off whatever bug is floating around (yes, it really does work– raw, diced garlic cloves, 3-4 X a day!), Onion Root Konji for warming cold tummies (thanks again, to my Chinese MD’s wife), Beet Root for eliminating uric acid from the lymph system, and Wild Yam Root for balancing hormones. Combine that with the level of sanity found nowhere outside a garden (they’ve done studies on that– touching dirt really is “grounding” LOL!), and the Ancient Roots in the pictographs we get to look at and learn from… I’m pretty thankful for roots of all sorts 🙂


Here are some of my favorite roots, and a brief introduction to their healing properties:
If you get information overload, take what you want now, and bookmark it for later 🙂
Comfrey Healing broken tissues of all sorts, soothing to broken skin, and can aid in healing broken bones. I’ve loved this one for rubbing the root-infused olive oil into the sprains and broken bones (less scratchy on the skin than the crushed leaves, though that works, too), and for salad greens and tea leaves. Yes, I’d steer clear of eating the root, and Russian Comfray internally, but the upright plant has never given me liver pains, where chemical toxins have, and certainly the topical applications have never been accused of anything but healing.
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/COMFREY.html
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail89.php

Ginger Great for digestion, nausea, cold tummy, or being out in the cold, and helps w/ circulation. I’ve done quarts of ginger tea and found wonderful, warming benefit from it for joint pains: a beautiful anti-inflammatory (pain reliever) 🙂 One word of caution on this one: if you’re pregnant, limit your ginger intake to a normal cup of tea a few times a day– small amounts can help w/ morning sickness, but high doses can stimulate contractions.
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Ginger.html
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail27.php

Garlic Highly anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal, great for heart health,  and promotes “friendly bacteria” in the guts. I’ve had wonderful results with killing all sorts of infections with this Natural Miracle.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail128.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/GARLIC.html

Onion Similar properties to garlic (in the same family), and the juice from the greens can be used to draw toxins out through the skin, helping to heal infections.
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Compresses.html

Chives Another member of the allum family (onions & garlic), and good for all the same purposes. The bigger plants are easier to work with, and so are more popular for medicinal usage when they’re available. If your back yard is crawling with chives in stead of garlic & onions, though, you’re good 🙂

Wild Yam Root / Bitter Yam Root My favorite anti-inflammatory herb of all time!!! GREAT for pain. I take a heaping tablespoon of the dried root every two hours ’till I don’t hurt any more. Warning, though: it’s not easy to get it down. Have a LOT of water handy: it’s like swallowing gravel. It’s also great for speeding up bm’s, so if you’re not needing that so much, you might like to take a bit of Zeolite or Bentonite clay with it. I’ve also used this to keep a pregnancy when I’d recently lost two. Bitter herbs and “more ancient varieties” of plants are higher in MSM, or “organic sulphur.” I’ve not found a real, reliable source for the sulphur content of various foods, and there is no USRDA on it, but it’s a natural pain killer, and it’s not in most of the “modern” foods in the grocery store at any useful level for killing pain. Once upon a time, it was these “bitter herbs” that were considered a necessary part of a healthy, well-balanced meal…. I think it’s interesting that when YHWH delivered the children of Israel from Egypt, they were commanded to eat the Passover meal “with bitter herbs.” After so long in slavery, and so much physical and psychological pollution from living in a culture of unclean practices– orgies to worship idols, hideous oppression, and unclean food all around, it may be that they needed those bitter herbs to help them heal and detoxify their bodies for the trek they had ahead of them!
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail119.php

Dandelion Root Beautiful blood & liver purifier– also good as a salad green when they’re young & tender. I’ve used milk thistle seeds, rinsed & soaked overnight, and swallowed in the morning to alleviate liver pains, but I’m told dandelion root works well, too.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail92.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Dandelion.html

Valerian Root Reduces anxiety, mild sedative. I like St John’s Wort tincture better, but different bodies react differently. The St. John’s wort is more about breaking down uric acid, which is helpful in conditions involving joint pains along with the nerve-soothing effects.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail117.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Valerian.html

Beet Great for digestion that needs a bit more HCl. The natural red dye in beets is GREAT for Gout symptoms, especially.
www.thespringoflife.net/beetroot.html

Maca This one I’ve only used a couple of times, but I loved it when I had it– my body seems to respond well to everything in the brassica family (broccoli, collards, kale, etc.). I’ve also seen it as a tool in the basket, along with wild yam root, of a friend who was concerned about losing her pregnancy. She has a gorgeous, healthy baby now. Traditional usage of it for that purpose in both man and beast ranges from ancient to modern times in South America. Both Maca and Wild Yam Root have been accused of being the “mandrakes” that Rachel bought from her sister in order to be able to conceive. I can’t verify that, but the concept that a root of some sort should be medicinal for infertility has been a “good direction” for me in finding more help along my healing path, and I’ve seen other women benefit from this general “pointing the way,” whether they’d connected it to Torah or not.
www.medicine-plants.com/articles/36/
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail251.php

Marshmallow Great for coughs and sore throats.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail133.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/MarshmallowRoot.html

Licorice Great digestive aid & soothing to the alimentary canal
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail102.php

Black & Blue Cohosh Both great womens’ remedies for miscellaneous needs… consult your midwife for appropriate timing &/ or homeopathic preparations.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail67.php
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail88.php

Burdock This one doubles as a Thistle. It’s similar to Dandelion: a great blood & liver purifier & tonic.
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail65.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Burdock.html

Ginseng Great for energy, circulation, and the immune system
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail68.php

Goldenseal This one has been a life-saver on multiple occasions– most notably in major cuts (that *technically should’ve been stitched). We’ve had doctors particularly impressed with the results. Great for killing infections of all sorts!
www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail155.php
www.herbalremediesinfo.com/Goldenseal.html

Dong Quai Another ladies’ remedy. Great for menstrual cramps. I wouldn’t use it during pregnancy. I like the flavor of ginger tea better, so I tend to go for a quart of hot ginger rather than the Dong Quai, but I’ve seen good effects from both. Eliminating every trace of sugar and dairy from my diet has been immensely useful there, too.
www.naturalherbsguide.com/dong-quai.html

These roots are only scratching the surface. Take these “pointers” from Torah, and see where they might lead you!

Standard Disclaimer:

I’m  no doc, and don’t pretend to be one. I am therefore not legally licensed to diagnose, cure, treat, prevent, or otherwise mitigate any disease, and neither is the stuff I generally choose for healing… but then, I’ve not been educated indoctrinated by boards with big pharma reps on them, either ;-)   so do your own research and find what works for you :-)

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5 comments
  1. what a beautiful, comprehensive and incredibly informative post!! thank you, friend. i am excited to share. 🙂

  2. Thank you, and thanks for reading… and sharing! Love to you! 🙂

    • Honored– Thank you!
      I appreciate you stopping in & letting me know!
      Blessings!

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